ELMER POPE

Guest Writer

 

Smoke Signals

Nov./Dec. '10

 

 
Good Day Folks,

Here's an interesting old S X S Buck Conner has had in his family since the 1890's, its a late 1870's combination gun. 

The name J. E. Evans is a common name on early double barreled shotguns. This one was a little different than what is normally seen being a shotgun and rifle combo. Thought you readers may like to look at a nice old gun that Buck brings out for fun on special occasions for show and tell. A firearm this old shoot quite well that surprise folks when looking at the targets shot with round ball, shot or combo of the same. 

 

A 16 gauge & .38 cal. gun with 30" barrels, percussion, checkered walnut, brass trim, marked J. E. Evans, Philadelphia.

 This is a 16 gauge & .38 cal. barrels - 30" in overall length including the breech plug. These bores dimensions appear ideal for our 16 gauge wads and .375 round ball with a .015 patch. The barrel bores are in shoot able condition with no dark pits. The barrel is proof marked with European proof marks, probably London, on the bottom of the breech, the barrels were exported to North America from England.

 

These are quality locks with the makers name engraved on the inside with the name J. E. Evans Philadelphia. as shown, faint but still readable.

The tail of the lock plate, and hammer are engraved with a floral pattern. The percussion hammers are 1870-1880's style with a European influence on the architecture. Stocked in walnut the butt does have a few mild stripes of figure, but is essentially straight grain which is ideal for such a combination bore shotgun/rifle. The wrist and forearm are both checkered to provide a secure grip. The barrels are fitted to the stock with a single captured key. Put the locks at half cock, and drift the wedge key. The barrels can then be removed for easy cleaning. Instead of a capture slot, a groove and pin prevent the wedge key from being completely removed from the stock, which prevents loss of the fitted key. This shotgun has a 14 and 13" trigger reach, which should fit today's average size shooter well. It weighs 10.8 pounds. Stocked straight, it could easily be used by a right or left hand shooter. The brass trigger guard has a engraved bow and grip rail. The trigger guard is threaded to the front trigger plate, and a single screw mounts the grip rail to the stock. The ramrod is fitted with a large brass loading tip.

The sighting arrangement is of the European style with the rear sight having a double notch. Which side do use, right notch for the right barrel or the left notch for the right barrel - crossing over, interesting?

The front sight uses the broad band and a flat wide barrel rib seen on English SXS and combination guns. The barrels are 30" overall in length. With the research done the name J. E. Evans, 226 South. St. Philadelphia. makes one believe this firm may have been an importer as well an assembler rather than just a manufacturer.

The front sight uses the broad band and a flat wide barrel rib seen on English SXS and combination guns. The barrels are 30" overall in length. With the research done the name J. E. Evans, 226 South. St. Philadelphia. makes one believe this firm may have been an importer as well an assembler rather than just a manufacturer.

The building on the left is the location;

200 South 325 West St. Philadelphia, PA.

(Taken in 1891 - Phila. Bulletin Newspaper)

___________________________

I remain, Yr Svt.                            

Elmer Pope

I'm the original Elmer (damnit).

 

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