EDIBLES - RECIPES - CAMP EQUIPAGE

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EDIBLES ??? 

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Last issue we provided you with the cultivated edibles, this issue we'll explore the foraged foods.  These were very important in early times as well as now. What would you do if in an unknown area without food? This could happen to our forefathers as well as to us even in this period of our modern life styles. Any kind of National disaster could put us in this situation, think about.

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Here's some information that may be handy when on the trail or at an encampment, always taken care of yourself and those around you.

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LYME DISEASE

Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of the deer tick, which may be carried by field mice, deer, and other wild animals. Woodys areas, marshy areas, and areas with high grass and brush are prime breeding places for the tick.

One misconception about Lyme disease is that it is confined primarily to the Northeast. However cases have been reported in nearly every state. The areas where the most cases have been reported are in Wisconsin and Minnesota in the Midwest, California and Oregon on the West Coast. Lyme disease should be taken seriously in all regions of the country.

Lyme disease can be serious, but it is almost never fatal. If treated promptly, before you experience joint inflammation, the diseaes can be cleared up completely with antibiotics.

The most recognizable sign of Lyme disease is a slowly expanding skin rash at the site of the tick bite. Other symptoms include fatigue, fever, headaches, stiff neck, and muscle and joint aches. These symptoms, which can last for several weeks, may resemble those of flu.

Good news is, new studies suggest that doctors are overreacting to their fears that a tick bite will lead to Lyme disease.

In places where Lyme disease is present, only 1% to 4% of the people bitten by ticks get the disease. But those who go to a doctor after a tick bite, 95% have blood tests and 55% are given antibiotics.

"If I were to find a tick that had been on me for a few hours, I'd remove it and do nothing more," says Alan Fix, MD. "If a tick has been attached for three days, that is where Lyme disease comes from."

Remember the best approach: watch and wait, look for early warning signs of the disease, a rash around the bite and flu-like symptoms. Then call your doctor.

Note: another example of unnecessary antibiotic use, which is causing antibiotic resistance.

New studies suggest that doctors are overreacting to their fears that a tick bite will lead to Lyme disease.

In places where Lyme disease is present, only 1% to 4% of the people bitten by ticks get the disease. But those who go to a doctor after a tick bite, 95% have blood tests and 55% are given antibiotics.

"If I were to find a tick that had been on me for a few hours, I'd remove it and do nothing more," says Alan Fix, MD.

"If a tick has been attached for three days, that is where Lyme disease comes from."

Best approach: watch and wait, look for early warning signs of the disease, a rash around the bite and flu-like symptoms. Then call your doctor.

Note: another example of unnecessary antibiotic use, which is causing antibiotic resistance.

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A FEW TRICK USED IN THIS SPORT FOR FOOT PAIN

Many foot problems can be treated while in camp, some when on the trail with a little common sense, simple treatments and camp rest could keep you from retreating home. But always remember if the problem does not show improvement within a few days, you should concider seeing a doctor.

There's always another camp and common sense should say when to hang it up, it may be the difference between being krippled and healing up for another trip. You will note that most problems listed are of our own doing, poor fitting or wrong sized footwear.

MORTON'S NEUROMA; intense pain usually caused by tight-fitting shoes that squeeze the nerves between the bones, causing the nerves to swell. There may also be numbness between the toes.

Use footwear that have plenty of room around the ball of the foot. Take aspirin or another pain reliever as directed for a few days to a week while in camp. I have taken deer or elk mocs, put two pair of heavy socks on , walked in a near-by stream until soaked, then wear them dry. Takes a good day for drying, put them in my bed roll at night to keep them from getting to stiff. The next morning use one pair of socks or barefooted when in camp, this seems to help with the numbness in short order and the sole of your foot is still protected.

BUNION; when looking at your bare foot, if your big toe points toward your other four toes, the end of the bone behind your big toe may rub against your shoe. The skin thickens over this bone, and the bone itself may develop a bony spur - which is called a "bunion".

Place a small amount of cloth between your big toe and your second toe so that your big toe becomes aligned with the other toes, (several cleaning patches work very nicely). The same padding around the bunion may help relieve pressure. Use the method as described for Morton's neuroma for sizing an old pair of camp mocs. By the way I always carry an old pair of used mocs for camp; lets the trail footwear cool out and your feet do the same, plus I then have them for use as mentioned in foot care in camp, (deerskin mocs weight next to nothing and take very little room in your gear).

As soon as returning home see your doctor, as an inflamed bunion may need a cortisone injection to provide relief, if to much out of alignment surgery may be needed.

CORNS & CALLUSES; usually caused by ill-fitting shoes and a friction or rubbing action happens.

Corns are usually found on top of the toes or arch. they appear as lumps of thickened skin that may either be hard, with a clear core, or soft and moist.

Calluses are thickened skin found across the heel and on the ball of the foot.

Make sure your footwear fits properly; wear your camp moc's and pad your foot as mentioned before while taking it easy in camp. When you return home "corn plasters" may give you relief, they contain 40% salicylic acid, available without prescription, are very effective. Follow the directions on the packaging, if condition continues see your doctor.

PLANTAR WARTS; often found on the ball of the foot, are caused by a virus, not by friction that many claim. You'll see small, black dots within the warts.

Again good footwear and corn plasters can help, but you will need to see your doctor. Not really a good camp treatment other than wearing comfortable shoes and do not go barefooted as you can pass this virus to others.

Doctors can use cold liquid nitrogen, heat electrocoagulation, or surgey to remove a plantar wart; unfortunately, they often recur.

METATARSAL STRESS FRACTURE; unaccustomed, strenuous use of the feet can crack the long metatarsal bones in the foot. The pain usually comes on gradually, and it gets worse with continued activity.

Unusual but can happen, your laid up with giving your feet a rest for a few days to a week or more. Crutches may be in order for a period of time, and could last as long as six weeks or longer. A cast should be avoided if at all possible; it will not reduce the healing time and may create other problems.

COLD WEATHER EXERCISE

Use common sense, exercise indoors; home, health club, mall walking, if its dark, icy, and /or very cold outside. If you have angina (chest pain) or asthma, exercise indoors and avoid the cold air.

Wear layers of clothing; peel them off if you become overheated. It's too cold to exercise outside when you can't put on or carry enough layers to stay warm.

Cover your ears, head and hands especially if it's cold and windy. exposed skin can freeze in one minute in bitter cold. Up to 50% of heat loss is through the head.

Warm your muscles up before you go outside, use a treadmill or stair climber, and do some stretching. Drink plenty of fluids, sweating in cold weather is less noticeable than sweating in hot weather.

Keep your feet warm and dry.

NOTE

At the '97 Western Nationals I stepped over a dead limb, catching the end of it with my heel, causing it to fly up and hit me in the back of the leg and calf. I went down like being kicked my a mule, my calf and muscle tied-up so tight that I was unable to straighten my leg for 15-20 minutes, and could only lay on the ground. Such a dumb thing to happen when helping to carry in another's equipage and ended up having to be helped back to camp.

Turned out that stick hit my sciatica nerve and I ended up on crutches for a period, chronic pain in hip and thigh, with a 3 1/2 to 4 month recovery time; I am told that this is a common injury with hikers and skiers. You can not believe the pain such a simple injury can give one and our sport makes us a natural for such a problem with our footwear, heavy packs, etc.

The bottom line is good footwear that fit correctly, an old pair of camp moc's

to let your feet relax while in camp and use care when moving down the trail, even flat ground can be a problem if not paying attention.

Source:

Take Care of Yourself by Donald M. Vickery, MD & James F. Fries, MD.

The Physician and Sportsmedicine, Vol 20, No1

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BACK COUNTRY WATER

Do not drink untreated water from lakes, rivers or streams, even if crystal clear. A number of micro organisms can cause illness for hikers and campers.

BOILING; bring water to a full, rolling boil for at least 3 minutes (5 to 10 minutes for elevations above 5,000 feet).

PROBLEM; flat taste, no removal of debris from the water; fuel is required; water must be cooled before you drink it.

A small group of us have traveled many of the waterways of the west, we carry oak kegged water for drinking and boil water for washing campwares and equipage. We bathe in these rivers and have been very lucky not to have had any problems yet. If limited for space figure about two quarts per person a day, if possible go with three quarts per person per day, and have resources available to refill your supply on longer trips.

IODINE CRYSTALS & TABLETS; available in recreational stores, shelf life printed on the container is very important, many are only dated with a 6 month useable date. Most with current dates are effective and convenient.

PROBLEM; slight change in the taste; no removal of debris from the water; does not kill cryptosporidium (systemic infection caused by fungus).

FILTERS; best systems have replaceable filters that can be removed and cleaned or replaced. Some filters screen out all organisms over 0.5 microns, which takes care of giardia cysts. Some filters screen down to 0.2 microns and eliminate cocci, protozoa, fungi, bacteria, and parasites. Some remove cryptosporidium.

PROBLEM; cleaning or disposal of used elements; cost. Filters are probably not effective against viruses such as hepatitis A.

NOTE

If you have diarrhea or stomach cramps that last more than several days, call a doctor.

SOURCES:

REI, Seattle; EPA, Groundwater & Drinking Water Branch

 

documented facts pertaining to periods & availability of foods.

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